Modern Baseball’s Relatable Mess

I wrote about relationships, O’Hare International Airport, and “The Thrash Particle”

Modern Baseball basically makes its living on being hyper-relatable. Whether it’s something broad like anxiety, regret, or depression, or something more specific like tales of life after graduation or unrequited love, the guys of Modern Baseball succeed in part because they turn the human experience into something we can all appreciate and identify with.

“The Thrash Particle” tackles jealousy, stupidity, and immaturity in relationships. As someone with the propensity to ruin a good thing, I can identify with Brendan Lukens when he says, “Too jealous to understand how dumb I was being, I did and said things to put my relationships to the test. In time, my paranoia grew and I began to hurt those I wanted to be with the most.”

Yup.

So Brendan dives into his self-made mess, describing a girl he likes, the little things he likes about her, and the way she left him hanging, which evidently set off this chain of events.

His crush, seemingly interested in the fact he’s in a band, but not in the fact that he wants to be with her, suggests he write a song about her. This doesn’t rub Brendan the right way.

“You suggested I write a song about the first time we met
But I can’t seem to remember where or when”

Unlike Kanye, who probably genuinely doesn’t know, Brendan seeks petty revenge by lying and saying he doesn’t even remember when he met her.

“So, is this the hook you wanted?
Is it stuck inside your head?
Can you sing it with your friends, or alone?”

This basically translates as “Are you happy now?”

But she’s not. And he’s not. And nobody is. And sometimes that’s how these things go.

As much as I love songs that instantly make me fall in love, there’s something to be said about a song that slowly sucks you in. That’s what “The Thrash Particle” did to me. I first heard it in an empty terminal at O’Hare and thought it was cool. By the time I got back home, I was really feeling it. Since then, it’s become one of my favorite Modern Baseball songs. Even the artwork by Beau Brynes is oddly captivating and perfect.

The band has remained coy about a new album, so who knows if this will end up on a full-length project. Internet rumors seem to indicate an album coming sooner than later. I sure hope so, and I sure hope it sounds like this.